Critical and biographical information on Henry Reed, World War II British poet, critic, translator, and radio dramatist — author of "Naming of Parts"
The poet Henry Reed The Poetry of Henry Reed
Search:
Criticism for the poetry of Henry Reed. Links to book reviews, excerpts, journal and newspaper articles, and other works which intrepret, analyze, or evaluate Reed's poems.
Poem title starts with:
A | B | C | D | E | F | H | I | J | K | L | M | Naming of Parts | O | P | R | S | T | U | W

"Antigone"
Harold Branam's entry for Reed includes a biography, analysis of the central works, and a brief bibliography.
In her review of the American edition of Reed's first volume of poems, Karsell says 'each line in the collection has been cut and finished with precision. One believes that no other form or words could have been used.'
The American poet and critic Randall Jarrell's curt review of A Map of Verona and Other Poems, in which he compares Reed to 'a nap after dinner.'
Phillips reviews the new, paperback release of Reed's Collected Poems. External link.
A glowing 1948 review by John Berryman of A Map of Verona and Other Poems.
Walter Allen's early review of A Map of Verona was quoted for the dust jacket blurb: 'No better first book of poetry has appeared for many years....'

"The Auction Sale"
Poet Jon Stallworthy's critical and biographical introduction to the Collected Poems.
Douglas Cleverdon's biographical note, focusing on Reed's radio drama, with a brief bibliography.
A biography of Reed by poet Jon Stallworthy, with comments on the poems, radio plays, and translations.
Jenkins feels that Reed's best poetry displays 'a special feeling for romantic potentiality, the moment before something tremendous happens or after it has receded.'
Lomas found Reed's poetry boring in 1946, and he finds little more redeeming about it in 1992: 'Reed is simply not interesting enough linguistically.'
Frank Kermode's evaluation of the Collected Poems, with personal reminiscences of Reed in London and Seattle.
A brief biography outlining Reed's radio plays, poetry, and translations.
Thorpe asserts that Reed's Lessons of the War sequence 'deserves far greater recognition.'
In his 1992 review of the Collected Poems, David Pascoe finds "The Auction Sale" to be Reed's best, and his translations are to be admired, but feels that Eliot will always be Reed's 'R.S.M.'
This 1992 review of the Collected Poems portrays Reed as an anachronism whose later work could never compare to his 'outstanding' earlier poems.
Of several contemporaries of Thomas and Auden, the author considers Reed to be the 'most considerable.'
Brownjohn feels Reed's 'shorter lyric pieces... [are] coherent and approachable, carefully shaped, both tender and sinister in mood.'
A 1991 review by Julian Symons of Reed's Collected Poems, with some biographical background.

"The Blissful Land"
Jenkins feels that Reed's best poetry displays 'a special feeling for romantic potentiality, the moment before something tremendous happens or after it has receded.'
Frank Kermode's evaluation of the Collected Poems, with personal reminiscences of Reed in London and Seattle.
A 1991 review by Julian Symons of Reed's Collected Poems, with some biographical background.

"Bocca di Magra"
Poet Jon Stallworthy's critical and biographical introduction to the Collected Poems.
Jenkins feels that Reed's best poetry displays 'a special feeling for romantic potentiality, the moment before something tremendous happens or after it has receded.'

"The Builders"
Critic William Arrowsmith proclaims Reed 'professional, original, and articulate' in this review of the American edition of A Map of Verona.

"The Changeling"
Poet Jon Stallworthy's critical and biographical introduction to the Collected Poems.
Lomas found Reed's poetry boring in 1946, and he finds little more redeeming about it in 1992: 'Reed is simply not interesting enough linguistically.'
Frank Kermode's evaluation of the Collected Poems, with personal reminiscences of Reed in London and Seattle.
Thorpe asserts that Reed's Lessons of the War sequence 'deserves far greater recognition.'

"Chard Whitlow"
Boyd feels that Reed 'can be deliberately ingenuous or rise to a tragic intensity all in the same poem...', and proclaims that 'Everything in this small book is of interest.'
Martin finds Reed's solution to the 'distrust of the large-scale statement, empty rhetoric, and vague romanticism' of the 1930s and 40s, 'unique'.
Poet Jon Stallworthy's critical and biographical introduction to the Collected Poems.
This encyclopedic entry has a short biography of Reed, and a bibliography which includes an extensive list of his radio dramas.
Poet Elizabeth Jennings' analysis of Reed's poetry, with a brief biography and a lengthy bibliography.
In her review of the American edition of Reed's first volume of poems, Karsell says 'each line in the collection has been cut and finished with precision. One believes that no other form or words could have been used.'
Ambrose Gordon, Jr. is stunned by the brilliance of the American edition of A Map of Verona, but seems to have doubts about Reed's originality.
Richard Boston's obituary for Reed remembers him as the playwright and the poet.
Jenkins feels that Reed's best poetry displays 'a special feeling for romantic potentiality, the moment before something tremendous happens or after it has receded.'
The Listener's reviewer calls Reed's A Map of Verona 'one of those rare books... which give new heart to dispirited poets.'
Lomas found Reed's poetry boring in 1946, and he finds little more redeeming about it in 1992: 'Reed is simply not interesting enough linguistically.'
Frank Kermode's evaluation of the Collected Poems, with personal reminiscences of Reed in London and Seattle.
A brief biography outlining Reed's radio plays, poetry, and translations.
Wilfrid Mellers compares Geoffrey Grigson and Reed, and finds Grigson to be merely a 'verse-maker', while Reed is a 'poet', in this review from 1946.
G.W. Stonier's review was quoted for the A Map of Verona dust jacket: 'Mr. Henry Reed is a rare poet in more senses than one.'
Phillips reviews the new, paperback release of Reed's Collected Poems. External link.
A short, but admirably thorough biography of Reed, focusing on the Lessons of the War, but also touching on the translations and radio plays.
In his 1992 review of the Collected Poems, David Pascoe finds "The Auction Sale" to be Reed's best, and his translations are to be admired, but feels that Eliot will always be Reed's 'R.S.M.'
A glowing 1948 review by John Berryman of A Map of Verona and Other Poems.
A brief, flattering biographical note by poet and editor Kenneth Allott: "Naming of Parts" and "Judging Distances" are 'among the best and most intelligent poems produced during the war.'
Leonard Unger's 1948 review of Reed's collection, A Map of Verona and Other Poems.
Of several contemporaries of Thomas and Auden, the author considers Reed to be the 'most considerable.'
Brownjohn feels Reed's 'shorter lyric pieces... [are] coherent and approachable, carefully shaped, both tender and sinister in mood.'
Reed's obituary, and notice of memorial funeral service.
A 1991 review by Julian Symons of Reed's Collected Poems, with some biographical background.
David Lougée's succinct and scathing review of the American edition of A Map of Verona and Other Poems calls Reed's collection a 'serious hoax.'
Biography of Reed, with commentary on his major works and a short bibliography.

"The Chateau"
Lomas found Reed's poetry boring in 1946, and he finds little more redeeming about it in 1992: 'Reed is simply not interesting enough linguistically.'
Frank Kermode's evaluation of the Collected Poems, with personal reminiscences of Reed in London and Seattle.
Thorpe asserts that Reed's Lessons of the War sequence 'deserves far greater recognition.'
This 1992 review of the Collected Poems portrays Reed as an anachronism whose later work could never compare to his 'outstanding' earlier poems.
Brownjohn feels Reed's 'shorter lyric pieces... [are] coherent and approachable, carefully shaped, both tender and sinister in mood.'

"Chrysothemis"
A short review of Reed's first book of poems from Alex Comfort, the author of The Joy of Sex.
Martin finds Reed's solution to the 'distrust of the large-scale statement, empty rhetoric, and vague romanticism' of the 1930s and 40s, 'unique'.
Harold Branam's entry for Reed includes a biography, analysis of the central works, and a brief bibliography.
In her review of the American edition of Reed's first volume of poems, Karsell says 'each line in the collection has been cut and finished with precision. One believes that no other form or words could have been used.'
Ambrose Gordon, Jr. is stunned by the brilliance of the American edition of A Map of Verona, but seems to have doubts about Reed's originality.
John Lehmann considers Reed's poems, and reflects on their early correspondence.
The American poet and critic Randall Jarrell's curt review of A Map of Verona and Other Poems, in which he compares Reed to 'a nap after dinner.'
A glowing 1948 review by John Berryman of A Map of Verona and Other Poems.
William Elton's short review of A Map of Verona and Other Poems, comparing Reed with T.S. Eliot.
Simon reviews the American edition of A Map of Verona and Other Poems, and finds 'Reed's purpose is to suggest more than to describe.'
A 1946 review of Reed's first book, A Map of Verona, by G.D. Klingopulos.
Of several contemporaries of Thomas and Auden, the author considers Reed to be the 'most considerable.'
Walter Allen's early review of A Map of Verona was quoted for the dust jacket blurb: 'No better first book of poetry has appeared for many years....'
Uncredited early review of A Map of Verona, calls Reed a '[master] of many moods.'

"De Arte Poetica"
In his 1992 review of the Collected Poems, David Pascoe finds "The Auction Sale" to be Reed's best, and his translations are to be admired, but feels that Eliot will always be Reed's 'R.S.M.'

"The Door and the Window"
A brief book review by Henry Rago of the American edition of A Map of Verona.
Poet Elizabeth Jennings' analysis of Reed's poetry, with a brief biography and a lengthy bibliography.
Wilfrid Mellers compares Geoffrey Grigson and Reed, and finds Grigson to be merely a 'verse-maker', while Reed is a 'poet', in this review from 1946.
Phillips reviews the new, paperback release of Reed's Collected Poems. External link.
Although Deutsch feels that Lessons of the War have a 'restrained power,' and some of Reed's poems 'exhibit a melancholy loveliness,' the book as a whole is left wanting.

"Envoy"
Douglas Cleverdon's biographical note, focusing on Reed's radio drama, with a brief bibliography.

"The Forest"
William Elton's short review of A Map of Verona and Other Poems, comparing Reed with T.S. Eliot.

"Hiding Beneath the Furze"
Wilfrid Mellers compares Geoffrey Grigson and Reed, and finds Grigson to be merely a 'verse-maker', while Reed is a 'poet', in this review from 1946.
This 1992 review of the Collected Poems portrays Reed as an anachronism whose later work could never compare to his 'outstanding' earlier poems.
Biography of Reed, with commentary on his major works and a short bibliography.

"The Interval"
A 1991 review by Julian Symons of Reed's Collected Poems, with some biographical background.

"The Intruder"
Poet Jon Stallworthy's critical and biographical introduction to the Collected Poems.
Thorpe asserts that Reed's Lessons of the War sequence 'deserves far greater recognition.'
A 1991 review by Julian Symons of Reed's Collected Poems, with some biographical background.

"Iseult Blaunchesmains"
Roger Simpson contemplates Reed's "Tintagel" poems, concerning the Tristan and Iseult legends.
Boyd feels that Reed 'can be deliberately ingenuous or rise to a tragic intensity all in the same poem...', and proclaims that 'Everything in this small book is of interest.'
Martin finds Reed's solution to the 'distrust of the large-scale statement, empty rhetoric, and vague romanticism' of the 1930s and 40s, 'unique'.
Harold Branam's entry for Reed includes a biography, analysis of the central works, and a brief bibliography.
In her review of the American edition of Reed's first volume of poems, Karsell says 'each line in the collection has been cut and finished with precision. One believes that no other form or words could have been used.'
John Lehmann considers Reed's poems, and reflects on their early correspondence.
A brief, flattering biographical note by poet and editor Kenneth Allott: "Naming of Parts" and "Judging Distances" are 'among the best and most intelligent poems produced during the war.'
Walter Allen's early review of A Map of Verona was quoted for the dust jacket blurb: 'No better first book of poetry has appeared for many years....'
Hodge finds 'dry charm as well as quiet wit' in "Judging Distances," but overall feels Reed is 'diffuse and not sufficiently accomplished.'

"Iseult La Belle"
Roger Simpson contemplates Reed's "Tintagel" poems, concerning the Tristan and Iseult legends.
Boyd feels that Reed 'can be deliberately ingenuous or rise to a tragic intensity all in the same poem...', and proclaims that 'Everything in this small book is of interest.'
Martin finds Reed's solution to the 'distrust of the large-scale statement, empty rhetoric, and vague romanticism' of the 1930s and 40s, 'unique'.
Harold Branam's entry for Reed includes a biography, analysis of the central works, and a brief bibliography.
In her review of the American edition of Reed's first volume of poems, Karsell says 'each line in the collection has been cut and finished with precision. One believes that no other form or words could have been used.'
Critic William Arrowsmith proclaims Reed 'professional, original, and articulate' in this review of the American edition of A Map of Verona.
John Lehmann considers Reed's poems, and reflects on their early correspondence.
A brief, flattering biographical note by poet and editor Kenneth Allott: "Naming of Parts" and "Judging Distances" are 'among the best and most intelligent poems produced during the war.'
A 1946 review of Reed's first book, A Map of Verona, by G.D. Klingopulos.
Walter Allen's early review of A Map of Verona was quoted for the dust jacket blurb: 'No better first book of poetry has appeared for many years....'
Hodge finds 'dry charm as well as quiet wit' in "Judging Distances," but overall feels Reed is 'diffuse and not sufficiently accomplished.'

"Ishmael"
Ambrose Gordon, Jr. is stunned by the brilliance of the American edition of A Map of Verona, but seems to have doubts about Reed's originality.
A brief biography outlining Reed's radio plays, poetry, and translations.
William Elton's short review of A Map of Verona and Other Poems, comparing Reed with T.S. Eliot.
Reed's preface to his adaptation of Melville's novel for BBC radio.
David Lougée's succinct and scathing review of the American edition of A Map of Verona and Other Poems calls Reed's collection a 'serious hoax.'

"Judging Distances"
A short review of Reed's first book of poems from Alex Comfort, the author of The Joy of Sex.
Reed's chapter from Ian Hamilton's survey of twentieth-century poets, with analysis and biography.
Listen to BBC recordings of Henry Reed and actor Frank Duncan reading "The Complete Lessons of the War."
Martin finds Reed's solution to the 'distrust of the large-scale statement, empty rhetoric, and vague romanticism' of the 1930s and 40s, 'unique'.
Harold Branam's entry for Reed includes a biography, analysis of the central works, and a brief bibliography.
Geoffrey Strickland's review of Reed's 1970 collection, Lessons of the War.
Collaborative, hypertext, class project on "Judging Distances." External link.
Richard Boston's obituary for Reed remembers him as the playwright and the poet.
A student paper relates Reed's poem to Heidegger's theories on the perception of time.
John Lehmann considers Reed's poems, and reflects on their early correspondence.
The Listener's reviewer calls Reed's A Map of Verona 'one of those rare books... which give new heart to dispirited poets.'
Lomas found Reed's poetry boring in 1946, and he finds little more redeeming about it in 1992: 'Reed is simply not interesting enough linguistically.'
G.W. Stonier's review was quoted for the A Map of Verona dust jacket: 'Mr. Henry Reed is a rare poet in more senses than one.'
Harvey Breit's 1947 review of A Map of Verona and Other Poems.
Vernon Scannell's commentary on Reed's series of poems, Lessons of the War.
An analysis of "Judging Distances," concerning the duality of tone, or voices, in the poem.
A short, but admirably thorough biography of Reed, focusing on the Lessons of the War, but also touching on the translations and radio plays.
In his 1992 review of the Collected Poems, David Pascoe finds "The Auction Sale" to be Reed's best, and his translations are to be admired, but feels that Eliot will always be Reed's 'R.S.M.'
A glowing 1948 review by John Berryman of A Map of Verona and Other Poems.
A brief, flattering biographical note by poet and editor Kenneth Allott: "Naming of Parts" and "Judging Distances" are 'among the best and most intelligent poems produced during the war.'
An excerpt from Ian Hamilton's series of essays on the poetry of the 1940s, regarding Reed's poems "Judging Distances" and "Naming of Parts."
Suggests study questions for "Naming of Parts" and "Judging Distances" to assist in reading and understanding the poems in class.
Brownjohn feels Reed's 'shorter lyric pieces... [are] coherent and approachable, carefully shaped, both tender and sinister in mood.'
The poet Marvin Bell considers Reed's "Naming of Parts," comparing it with his own experience training and serving in the U.S. Army.
Hodge finds 'dry charm as well as quiet wit' in "Judging Distances," but overall feels Reed is 'diffuse and not sufficiently accomplished.'
Contains an excellent examination of the 'military/poetic' problem in Reed's "Judging Distances," and "Unarmed Combat."
Using Reed's poetry as an example of the 'individual's response' to the Second World War, Jones discusses the contrasts, irony, and ambiguities found in the Lessons of the War.
Biography of Reed, with commentary on his major works and a short bibliography.

"King Mark"
Roger Simpson contemplates Reed's "Tintagel" poems, concerning the Tristan and Iseult legends.
Boyd feels that Reed 'can be deliberately ingenuous or rise to a tragic intensity all in the same poem...', and proclaims that 'Everything in this small book is of interest.'
Martin finds Reed's solution to the 'distrust of the large-scale statement, empty rhetoric, and vague romanticism' of the 1930s and 40s, 'unique'.
Harold Branam's entry for Reed includes a biography, analysis of the central works, and a brief bibliography.
In her review of the American edition of Reed's first volume of poems, Karsell says 'each line in the collection has been cut and finished with precision. One believes that no other form or words could have been used.'
John Lehmann considers Reed's poems, and reflects on their early correspondence.
Jenkins feels that Reed's best poetry displays 'a special feeling for romantic potentiality, the moment before something tremendous happens or after it has receded.'
G.W. Stonier's review was quoted for the A Map of Verona dust jacket: 'Mr. Henry Reed is a rare poet in more senses than one.'
A brief, flattering biographical note by poet and editor Kenneth Allott: "Naming of Parts" and "Judging Distances" are 'among the best and most intelligent poems produced during the war.'
Walter Allen's early review of A Map of Verona was quoted for the dust jacket blurb: 'No better first book of poetry has appeared for many years....'

"L'Envoi"
Poet Jon Stallworthy's critical and biographical introduction to the Collected Poems.
Frank Kermode's evaluation of the Collected Poems, with personal reminiscences of Reed in London and Seattle.
A letter to the editor from Ed Leimbacher recalls Reed's days as a visiting professor in Seattle.

"Lives"
Martin finds Reed's solution to the 'distrust of the large-scale statement, empty rhetoric, and vague romanticism' of the 1930s and 40s, 'unique'.
The Listener's reviewer calls Reed's A Map of Verona 'one of those rare books... which give new heart to dispirited poets.'
David Lougée's succinct and scathing review of the American edition of A Map of Verona and Other Poems calls Reed's collection a 'serious hoax.'

"A Map of Verona"
Poet Elizabeth Jennings' analysis of Reed's poetry, with a brief biography and a lengthy bibliography.
Harold Branam's entry for Reed includes a biography, analysis of the central works, and a brief bibliography.
Ambrose Gordon, Jr. is stunned by the brilliance of the American edition of A Map of Verona, but seems to have doubts about Reed's originality.
Church describes Reed 'as a man of wry, almost sly humour, endowed with a shrewd critical mind that gives his first work a matter-of-factness wholly acceptable to the fastidious reader's palate.'
This 1948 review of A Map of Verona and Other Poems compares Reed's poetry with that of his American contemporary, John Berryman.
G.W. Stonier's review was quoted for the A Map of Verona dust jacket: 'Mr. Henry Reed is a rare poet in more senses than one.'
Harvey Breit's 1947 review of A Map of Verona and Other Poems.
A short, but admirably thorough biography of Reed, focusing on the Lessons of the War, but also touching on the translations and radio plays.
Two excerpts concerning Reed's poems from A.T. Tolley's book about English poetry of the 1940s.
William Elton's short review of A Map of Verona and Other Poems, comparing Reed with T.S. Eliot.
Simon reviews the American edition of A Map of Verona and Other Poems, and finds 'Reed's purpose is to suggest more than to describe.'
A 1946 review of Reed's first book, A Map of Verona, by G.D. Klingopulos.
David Lougée's succinct and scathing review of the American edition of A Map of Verona and Other Poems calls Reed's collection a 'serious hoax.'

"Morning"
Critic William Arrowsmith proclaims Reed 'professional, original, and articulate' in this review of the American edition of A Map of Verona.
William Elton's short review of A Map of Verona and Other Poems, comparing Reed with T.S. Eliot.
Simon reviews the American edition of A Map of Verona and Other Poems, and finds 'Reed's purpose is to suggest more than to describe.'

"Movement of Bodies"
Listen to BBC recordings of Henry Reed and actor Frank Duncan reading "The Complete Lessons of the War."
Douglas Cleverdon's biographical note, focusing on Reed's radio drama, with a brief bibliography.
Geoffrey Strickland's review of Reed's 1970 collection, Lessons of the War.
A short, but admirably thorough biography of Reed, focusing on the Lessons of the War, but also touching on the translations and radio plays.
The poet Marvin Bell considers Reed's "Naming of Parts," comparing it with his own experience training and serving in the U.S. Army.

"Naming of Parts"
A short review of Reed's first book of poems from Alex Comfort, the author of The Joy of Sex.
Reed's chapter from Ian Hamilton's survey of twentieth-century poets, with analysis and biography.
Speech and diction in Reed's "Naming of Parts." External link, .pdf file.
Listen to BBC recordings of Henry Reed and actor Frank Duncan reading "The Complete Lessons of the War."
Mentioned several times in discussing British poetry of World War II, Shires looks at "Naming of Parts" at some length.
Martin finds Reed's solution to the 'distrust of the large-scale statement, empty rhetoric, and vague romanticism' of the 1930s and 40s, 'unique'.
Discusses Reed's contribution to the poetry of the Second World War.
Poet Jon Stallworthy's critical and biographical introduction to the Collected Poems.
Poet Elizabeth Jennings' analysis of Reed's poetry, with a brief biography and a lengthy bibliography.
Harold Branam's entry for Reed includes a biography, analysis of the central works, and a brief bibliography.
Contains a podcast on the use of tone in poetry, and the difficulties inherent in interpreting Reed's "Naming of Parts." External link, contains .mp3 file.
Douglas Cleverdon's biographical note, focusing on Reed's radio drama, with a brief bibliography.
A biography of Reed by poet Jon Stallworthy, with comments on the poems, radio plays, and translations.
Geoffrey Strickland's review of Reed's 1970 collection, Lessons of the War.
Richard Condon's summary and critical analysis of Reed's poem, "Naming of Parts."
Examines the linguistic qualities and style variation in Reed's "Naming of Parts."
Visual semiotician Michael O'Toole analyzes "Naming of Parts" within a systemic-functional framework.
Richard Boston's obituary for Reed remembers him as the playwright and the poet.
An excellent interview with Reed, for a retrospective of the Hilda Tablet series of radio plays.
John Lehmann considers Reed's poems, and reflects on their early correspondence.
A student paper considers Eden imagery in Reed's most famous poem. External link, archived copy.
Jenkins feels that Reed's best poetry displays 'a special feeling for romantic potentiality, the moment before something tremendous happens or after it has receded.'
Kirkus reviews A Map of Verona, contrasting Reed against Richard Wilbur.
The Listener's reviewer calls Reed's A Map of Verona 'one of those rare books... which give new heart to dispirited poets.'
Lomas found Reed's poetry boring in 1946, and he finds little more redeeming about it in 1992: 'Reed is simply not interesting enough linguistically.'
A detailed explication of Reed's most famous poem by Major Edward F. Palm, USMC (Ret.), including comments on the poetic forms and devices used, and interpretation of themes and meanings.
A brief biography outlining Reed's radio plays, poetry, and translations.
Analysis, study questions, and lesson plans for teaching Reed's poem "Naming of Parts" in class.
Short film adaptation of Henry Reed's poem, showing scenes of young trainees receiving instruction in rifle assembly, and contrasting scenes of the life-affirming beauty of blossoms, branches, and bees.
G.W. Stonier's review was quoted for the A Map of Verona dust jacket: 'Mr. Henry Reed is a rare poet in more senses than one.'
Harvey Breit's 1947 review of A Map of Verona and Other Poems.
Vernon Scannell's commentary on Reed's series of poems, Lessons of the War.
Thorpe asserts that Reed's Lessons of the War sequence 'deserves far greater recognition.'
A short, but admirably thorough biography of Reed, focusing on the Lessons of the War, but also touching on the translations and radio plays.
In his 1992 review of the Collected Poems, David Pascoe finds "The Auction Sale" to be Reed's best, and his translations are to be admired, but feels that Eliot will always be Reed's 'R.S.M.'
A glowing 1948 review by John Berryman of A Map of Verona and Other Poems.
A brief, flattering biographical note by poet and editor Kenneth Allott: "Naming of Parts" and "Judging Distances" are 'among the best and most intelligent poems produced during the war.'
Essay on the lowly and peculiar piling swivel, featured in Reed's "Naming of Parts."
This 1992 review of the Collected Poems portrays Reed as an anachronism whose later work could never compare to his 'outstanding' earlier poems.
An excerpt from Ian Hamilton's series of essays on the poetry of the 1940s, regarding Reed's poems "Judging Distances" and "Naming of Parts."
Two excerpts concerning Reed's poems from A.T. Tolley's book about English poetry of the 1940s.
A 1946 review of Reed's first book, A Map of Verona, by G.D. Klingopulos.
Of several contemporaries of Thomas and Auden, the author considers Reed to be the 'most considerable.'
Suggests study questions for "Naming of Parts" and "Judging Distances" to assist in reading and understanding the poems in class.
Brownjohn feels Reed's 'shorter lyric pieces... [are] coherent and approachable, carefully shaped, both tender and sinister in mood.'
Walter Allen's early review of A Map of Verona was quoted for the dust jacket blurb: 'No better first book of poetry has appeared for many years....'
Reed's obituary, and notice of memorial funeral service.
Although Deutsch feels that Lessons of the War have a 'restrained power,' and some of Reed's poems 'exhibit a melancholy loveliness,' the book as a whole is left wanting.
The poet Marvin Bell considers Reed's "Naming of Parts," comparing it with his own experience training and serving in the U.S. Army.
Contains an excellent examination of the 'military/poetic' problem in Reed's "Judging Distances," and "Unarmed Combat."
David Lougée's succinct and scathing review of the American edition of A Map of Verona and Other Poems calls Reed's collection a 'serious hoax.'
Using Reed's poetry as an example of the 'individual's response' to the Second World War, Jones discusses the contrasts, irony, and ambiguities found in the Lessons of the War.
Biography of Reed, with commentary on his major works and a short bibliography.

"Outside and In"
A brief book review by Henry Rago of the American edition of A Map of Verona.
Frank Kermode's evaluation of the Collected Poems, with personal reminiscences of Reed in London and Seattle.
William Elton's short review of A Map of Verona and Other Poems, comparing Reed with T.S. Eliot.
Simon reviews the American edition of A Map of Verona and Other Poems, and finds 'Reed's purpose is to suggest more than to describe.'
Although Deutsch feels that Lessons of the War have a 'restrained power,' and some of Reed's poems 'exhibit a melancholy loveliness,' the book as a whole is left wanting.

"Philoctetes"
A short review of Reed's first book of poems from Alex Comfort, the author of The Joy of Sex.
Boyd feels that Reed 'can be deliberately ingenuous or rise to a tragic intensity all in the same poem...', and proclaims that 'Everything in this small book is of interest.'
Martin finds Reed's solution to the 'distrust of the large-scale statement, empty rhetoric, and vague romanticism' of the 1930s and 40s, 'unique'.
Poet Elizabeth Jennings' analysis of Reed's poetry, with a brief biography and a lengthy bibliography.
Harold Branam's entry for Reed includes a biography, analysis of the central works, and a brief bibliography.
In her review of the American edition of Reed's first volume of poems, Karsell says 'each line in the collection has been cut and finished with precision. One believes that no other form or words could have been used.'
John Lehmann considers Reed's poems, and reflects on their early correspondence.
Frank Kermode's evaluation of the Collected Poems, with personal reminiscences of Reed in London and Seattle.
The American poet and critic Randall Jarrell's curt review of A Map of Verona and Other Poems, in which he compares Reed to 'a nap after dinner.'
G.W. Stonier's review was quoted for the A Map of Verona dust jacket: 'Mr. Henry Reed is a rare poet in more senses than one.'
A glowing 1948 review by John Berryman of A Map of Verona and Other Poems.
A brief, flattering biographical note by poet and editor Kenneth Allott: "Naming of Parts" and "Judging Distances" are 'among the best and most intelligent poems produced during the war.'
Simon reviews the American edition of A Map of Verona and Other Poems, and finds 'Reed's purpose is to suggest more than to describe.'
A 1946 review of Reed's first book, A Map of Verona, by G.D. Klingopulos.
Brownjohn feels Reed's 'shorter lyric pieces... [are] coherent and approachable, carefully shaped, both tender and sinister in mood.'
Walter Allen's early review of A Map of Verona was quoted for the dust jacket blurb: 'No better first book of poetry has appeared for many years....'
Uncredited early review of A Map of Verona, calls Reed a '[master] of many moods.'
Hodge finds 'dry charm as well as quiet wit' in "Judging Distances," but overall feels Reed is 'diffuse and not sufficiently accomplished.'
Biography of Reed, with commentary on his major works and a short bibliography.

"The Place and the Person"
The Listener's reviewer calls Reed's A Map of Verona 'one of those rare books... which give new heart to dispirited poets.'
Wilfrid Mellers compares Geoffrey Grigson and Reed, and finds Grigson to be merely a 'verse-maker', while Reed is a 'poet', in this review from 1946.
G.W. Stonier's review was quoted for the A Map of Verona dust jacket: 'Mr. Henry Reed is a rare poet in more senses than one.'
In his 1992 review of the Collected Poems, David Pascoe finds "The Auction Sale" to be Reed's best, and his translations are to be admired, but feels that Eliot will always be Reed's 'R.S.M.'
Simon reviews the American edition of A Map of Verona and Other Poems, and finds 'Reed's purpose is to suggest more than to describe.'
Leonard Unger's 1948 review of Reed's collection, A Map of Verona and Other Poems.

"Psychological Warfare"
Reed's chapter from Ian Hamilton's survey of twentieth-century poets, with analysis and biography.
A letter to the editor from Ed Leimbacher recalls Reed's days as a visiting professor in Seattle.
Thorpe asserts that Reed's Lessons of the War sequence 'deserves far greater recognition.'
Brownjohn feels Reed's 'shorter lyric pieces... [are] coherent and approachable, carefully shaped, both tender and sinister in mood.'
A 1991 review by Julian Symons of Reed's Collected Poems, with some biographical background.

"The Return"
Lomas found Reed's poetry boring in 1946, and he finds little more redeeming about it in 1992: 'Reed is simply not interesting enough linguistically.'
Wilfrid Mellers compares Geoffrey Grigson and Reed, and finds Grigson to be merely a 'verse-maker', while Reed is a 'poet', in this review from 1946.
William Elton's short review of A Map of Verona and Other Poems, comparing Reed with T.S. Eliot.
Simon reviews the American edition of A Map of Verona and Other Poems, and finds 'Reed's purpose is to suggest more than to describe.'
A 1946 review of Reed's first book, A Map of Verona, by G.D. Klingopulos.

"Returning of Issue"
Listen to BBC recordings of Henry Reed and actor Frank Duncan reading "The Complete Lessons of the War."
Geoffrey Strickland's review of Reed's 1970 collection, Lessons of the War.
A short, but admirably thorough biography of Reed, focusing on the Lessons of the War, but also touching on the translations and radio plays.
Brownjohn feels Reed's 'shorter lyric pieces... [are] coherent and approachable, carefully shaped, both tender and sinister in mood.'
The poet Marvin Bell considers Reed's "Naming of Parts," comparing it with his own experience training and serving in the U.S. Army.

"The River"
A 1991 review by Julian Symons of Reed's Collected Poems, with some biographical background.

"Sailor's Harbour"
A brief biography outlining Reed's radio plays, poetry, and translations.
G.W. Stonier's review was quoted for the A Map of Verona dust jacket: 'Mr. Henry Reed is a rare poet in more senses than one.'

"The Sound of Horses' Hooves"
This 1992 review of the Collected Poems portrays Reed as an anachronism whose later work could never compare to his 'outstanding' earlier poems.

"South"
Poet Jon Stallworthy's critical and biographical introduction to the Collected Poems.
Critic William Arrowsmith proclaims Reed 'professional, original, and articulate' in this review of the American edition of A Map of Verona.
This 1992 review of the Collected Poems portrays Reed as an anachronism whose later work could never compare to his 'outstanding' earlier poems.

"Three Words"
Frank Kermode's evaluation of the Collected Poems, with personal reminiscences of Reed in London and Seattle.
A 1991 review by Julian Symons of Reed's Collected Poems, with some biographical background.

"The Town Itself"
Poet Jon Stallworthy's critical and biographical introduction to the Collected Poems.
Frank Kermode's evaluation of the Collected Poems, with personal reminiscences of Reed in London and Seattle.
This 1992 review of the Collected Poems portrays Reed as an anachronism whose later work could never compare to his 'outstanding' earlier poems.
A 1991 review by Julian Symons of Reed's Collected Poems, with some biographical background.

"Tristram"
A short review of Reed's first book of poems from Alex Comfort, the author of The Joy of Sex.
Roger Simpson contemplates Reed's "Tintagel" poems, concerning the Tristan and Iseult legends.
Boyd feels that Reed 'can be deliberately ingenuous or rise to a tragic intensity all in the same poem...', and proclaims that 'Everything in this small book is of interest.'
Poet Elizabeth Jennings' analysis of Reed's poetry, with a brief biography and a lengthy bibliography.
Harold Branam's entry for Reed includes a biography, analysis of the central works, and a brief bibliography.
In her review of the American edition of Reed's first volume of poems, Karsell says 'each line in the collection has been cut and finished with precision. One believes that no other form or words could have been used.'
Ambrose Gordon, Jr. is stunned by the brilliance of the American edition of A Map of Verona, but seems to have doubts about Reed's originality.
John Lehmann considers Reed's poems, and reflects on their early correspondence.
Jenkins feels that Reed's best poetry displays 'a special feeling for romantic potentiality, the moment before something tremendous happens or after it has receded.'
The Listener's reviewer calls Reed's A Map of Verona 'one of those rare books... which give new heart to dispirited poets.'
The American poet and critic Randall Jarrell's curt review of A Map of Verona and Other Poems, in which he compares Reed to 'a nap after dinner.'
G.W. Stonier's review was quoted for the A Map of Verona dust jacket: 'Mr. Henry Reed is a rare poet in more senses than one.'
Phillips reviews the new, paperback release of Reed's Collected Poems. External link.
A glowing 1948 review by John Berryman of A Map of Verona and Other Poems.
A brief, flattering biographical note by poet and editor Kenneth Allott: "Naming of Parts" and "Judging Distances" are 'among the best and most intelligent poems produced during the war.'
Walter Allen's early review of A Map of Verona was quoted for the dust jacket blurb: 'No better first book of poetry has appeared for many years....'
Uncredited early review of A Map of Verona, calls Reed a '[master] of many moods.'
A 1991 review by Julian Symons of Reed's Collected Poems, with some biographical background.
Hodge finds 'dry charm as well as quiet wit' in "Judging Distances," but overall feels Reed is 'diffuse and not sufficiently accomplished.'
Biography of Reed, with commentary on his major works and a short bibliography.

"Unarmed Combat"
A short review of Reed's first book of poems from Alex Comfort, the author of The Joy of Sex.
Listen to BBC recordings of Henry Reed and actor Frank Duncan reading "The Complete Lessons of the War."
Boyd feels that Reed 'can be deliberately ingenuous or rise to a tragic intensity all in the same poem...', and proclaims that 'Everything in this small book is of interest.'
Martin finds Reed's solution to the 'distrust of the large-scale statement, empty rhetoric, and vague romanticism' of the 1930s and 40s, 'unique'.
Discusses Reed's contribution to the poetry of the Second World War.
Geoffrey Strickland's review of Reed's 1970 collection, Lessons of the War.
John Lehmann considers Reed's poems, and reflects on their early correspondence.
The Listener's reviewer calls Reed's A Map of Verona 'one of those rare books... which give new heart to dispirited poets.'
Wilfrid Mellers compares Geoffrey Grigson and Reed, and finds Grigson to be merely a 'verse-maker', while Reed is a 'poet', in this review from 1946.
G.W. Stonier's review was quoted for the A Map of Verona dust jacket: 'Mr. Henry Reed is a rare poet in more senses than one.'
Vernon Scannell's commentary on Reed's series of poems, Lessons of the War.
A short, but admirably thorough biography of Reed, focusing on the Lessons of the War, but also touching on the translations and radio plays.
A glowing 1948 review by John Berryman of A Map of Verona and Other Poems.
William Elton's short review of A Map of Verona and Other Poems, comparing Reed with T.S. Eliot.
A 1946 review of Reed's first book, A Map of Verona, by G.D. Klingopulos.
The poet Marvin Bell considers Reed's "Naming of Parts," comparing it with his own experience training and serving in the U.S. Army.
Contains an excellent examination of the 'military/poetic' problem in Reed's "Judging Distances," and "Unarmed Combat."
Using Reed's poetry as an example of the 'individual's response' to the Second World War, Jones discusses the contrasts, irony, and ambiguities found in the Lessons of the War.

"The Wall"
Wilfrid Mellers compares Geoffrey Grigson and Reed, and finds Grigson to be merely a 'verse-maker', while Reed is a 'poet', in this review from 1946.
William Elton's short review of A Map of Verona and Other Poems, comparing Reed with T.S. Eliot.
A 1946 review of Reed's first book, A Map of Verona, by G.D. Klingopulos.

top

solearabiantree

Page last modified: 01 October 2016